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Jewish Communal Professionals in Northern Westchester and the River Towns Learn to Open the Tent

On June 9th, Big Tent Judaism/Jewish Outreach Institute’s Executive Director, Rabbi Kerry Olitzky, shared important knowledge and resources about building a more inclusive Jewish community with Jewish communal professionals in Westchester County, NY as a part of a partnership with UJA-Federation of New York. Speaking at the Rosenthal JCC in Pleasantville, Rabbi Olitzky challenged professionals to rethink traditional methods of outreach and find new ways to increase engagement.

Two major difficulties many Jewish institutions face is finding people where they are and lowering barriers that may prevent newcomers from wanting to engage in Jewish life. Kerry’s presentation focused on Big Tent Judaism’s model of Public Space JudaismSM to find and engage more people. Public Space Judaism takes programming outside the four walls of a Jewish institution into a public space, bringing Jewish life to where people are. Rabbi Olitzky also spoke about how to positively engage specific populations these Jewish communal professionals may find, such as less-engaged Jews and intermarried families. (more…)



Public Space Judaism as Experiential Education

I am a trained Jewish educator and yet there are those who scrutinize our various educational programs. As a result, I decided to apply objective criteria to some of our work, specifically the training of outreach professionals who are engaged in Public Space Judaism. The following article is a result (as published in EJewishPhilanthropy).

Can the training of outreach professionals engaged in Public Space Judaism be considered Experiential Education by academic standards?

by Dr. Kerry M. Olitzky

While not all programs of Jewish engagement are necessarily experiential education, at Big Tent Judaism/Jewish Outreach Institute, we were purposeful in incorporating experiential education into our programs of Public Space Judaism?, a phrase we coined to refer to a method that we began to advocate some 15 years ago. While there had been other ad hoc examples of doing programs in public spaces, particularly through Chabad, we developed a theoretical construct for this approach to programming, and educate and continue to innovate in this space through such programs at Passover in the Matzah Aisle™ and Hands on Hanukkah™. These programs are operated by Jewish communal professionals and volunteers at synagogues, JCCs, federations, and other Jewish organizations across denominational lines through JOI’s formalized program of professional training. (more…)



Everybody Thinks They’re ‘Chosen’

Why is it that Jewish people are considered “chosen?”
In this piece, featured in New York Jewish Week on Tuesday, June 3, 2014, Associate Executive Director Paul Golin tackles the issue.

I’ve come to see how the disconnect between “everyone is equal” versus “only marry Jewish” is part of a larger and longer-term clash of narratives: universalism versus Jewish particularism, or “chosenness.” Apparently, it’s something the Rabbis have struggled with for millennia, and is relevant to consider this eve of Shavuot when we mark the anniversary of being “chosen” to accept the Torah and covenant.

Read the rest of the article here.



Moms’ Night Out

Moms’ night out is therapy, and this week I had a great session. Sangria and seemingly endless tapas helped stretch the conversation for several hours, until we realized (once again) that we were the last table in the restaurant.

While the talk tends to revolve around our children (“Is my daughter ever going to (fill in the blank)?”), our spouses (“Is my partner ever going to (fill in the blank)?”), and our jobs (“Am I ever going to (fill in the blank)?”), last night the conversation turned to the Jewish community. (more…)



Welcoming Everyone into the Tent this Shavuot

As we enter the holiday of Shavuot, which commemorates Moses receiving the Ten Commandments at Mount Sinai, our attention also turns to the Book of Ruth, which is read during this holiday. The Book of Ruth recounts the story of Ruth, a Moabite woman who becomes a Jew-by-Choice and is the great-grandmother of King David. Ruth is presumed to have converted after uttering the following words: “Where you go, I will go. Where you sleep, I will sleep. Your people will be my people. Your God will be my God. Where you die, I will die, and there I will be buried. Thus may the LORD do to me, and worse, if anything but death parts you and me.”

In her moving article in the Times of Israel, Shoshanna Jaskoll outlines modern day contentions surrounding conversion. People who wish to convert to Judaism must undergo an arduous process, and Jaskoll argues that based on the story of Ruth and her conversion, the conversion practices maintained by the Orthodox rabbinate (as outlined in the article) are inaccurate. Jaskoll interprets Ruth’s proclamation of conversion as such: (more…)



Celebrating Ruth for Shavuot

Shavuot begins the evening of June 2nd and ends the evening of June 4th.
Commemorating the receiving of the Ten Commandments at Mount Sinai, the holiday of Shavuot is also when we traditionally read the Book of Ruth - the story of a woman of another background who embraces the Jewish People as her own.

The namesake of our Empowering Ruth program, Ruth exemplifies what can happen when the Jewish community truly opens its tent to all who wish to enter. Empowering Ruth is a program for women who have chosen Judaism and offers education and support as they continue their Jewish journeys. We invite you to celebrate Shavuot by reading the Book of Ruth - in graphic novel form! Please consider sharing this image on Facebook, and read the Book of Ruth graphic novel by clicking here.



Massage the Message

Mitchell Shames is the Chair of the Board for Big Tent Judaism/Jewish Outreach Institute. Here is what he had to say about feeling excluded.

This piece was originally featured in eJewish Philanthropy on Thursday, May 29, 2014. To read it, please click here.

Last Wednesday night my wife and I attended the annual fundraising dinner for Boston’s Jewish Family and Children’s Services. Although somewhat formulaic, as these evenings tend to be, we nonetheless had a wonderful time catching up with longstanding friends and reconnecting with a vitally important agency within our community.

The evening included a sweeping review of the agency’s 150 year history, comments by extraordinary teenagers whose disintegrating family (due to death and illness) was saved in large part through the efforts of JF&CS, and lastly, a compelling pitch, steeped in Torah, for JF&CS’s new fund-raising campaign to alleviate poverty. (more…)



Creating a Welcoming Jewish Community that Crosses Borders

Growing up in suburban Chicago, I never struggled to access Jewish life. Synagogue, Hebrew school, Jewish youth groups, Israel programs, or the social networks emerging from these activities, all less than a 30-minute drive away. My attention was, therefore, completely drawn to this article from the Jewish Journal about children from Tijuana’s Jewish community who receive an education at San Diego area Jewish day schools. These students make a daily trek from Tijuana to San Diego, two-hour-long commutes to school, 12+ hour days beginning at 5 a.m. ostensibly because Tijuana’s Jewish community of approximately 2,000 cannot sustain a Jewish day school.

These families invest large amounts of time and money so that their children can attend a Jewish school and so they can have access to a larger Jewish community: (more…)



The Stars at Night Are Big And Bright

When you look up at night, you can see the stars twinkle. For parents, our children are our stars, and we all want the best for our children. We want them to thrive, be happy, and feel successful. However, just as stars are parts of constellations, every child is a part of a family structure, and each family has its own unique ethos or character. A family’s ethos is reflected in how we live our lives, our values, customs, and practices. A common theme among Jewish families is the choice to identify with the Jewish tradition, and the myriad ways in which to do so.

One of the beautiful things about the Jewish tradition is its ability to highlight and strengthen values, ideals, and beliefs through celebration, scholarship, and community. As the Jewish community continues to diversify, the ways to experience and pass on Jewish traditions continues to increase. For some, complementing a public or private school education with Jewish experiences and education is the answer. Other families take advantage of all that the Jewish tradition has to offer by sending their children to Jewish day schools. (more…)



Why in Hebrew?

A recent article in The New Republic titled “Why I Stopped Speaking to My Daughter in Hebrew,” made me think about how I talk to my son. As the father of a now bilingual three-year-old, I connected with Scheiber’s story about his effort to transmit Hebrew fluency to his daughter. In his story, Scheiber mostly abandons his attempt to speak with his daughter exclusively in his native language after coming to terms with what he calls the “fraudulence” of his Jewish Israeli identity.

At three years of age, my own son is fluent in both Hebrew and English, and Hebrew is his dominant language. And while his situation is slightly different from Scheiber’s (Scheiber had only one parent who was a Hebrew speaker, my son has two parents and three grandparents who are native speakers of the language) I imagine that my son may encounter similar dilemmas when he grows up. While Jewish Israeli culture is not only about speaking Hebrew, Hebrew does play an important role. So as a bilingual growing up in an English-speaking environment, my son will have to decide for himself what role Hebrew plays in his own identity. Hebrew fluency, I feel, is a precious gift that I am giving him, and I hope that this gift will be a source of enrichment for him. But what he will do with this gift is ultimately up to him. (more…)



American Jews - Part of Mainstream American Society

I had the pleasure of offering the keynote address at the Engaging Interfaith Families Conference sponsored by UJA-Federation of New York on May 12th. The conference was held in anticipation of the new year for program grants for local institutions that are prepared to open their tents to interfaith families.

We at Big Tent Judaism/Jewish Outreach Institute applaud both UJA-Federation and the local institutions that are involved for working hard to make our community more inclusive, particularly for interfaith families. It is also why we are so proud to be working with UJA-Federation on our Big Tent Judaism initiative in Northern Westchester County and the River Towns. (more…)



Over 1,000 People Reached through JOI Programming this Passover

This past Passover, Big Tent Judaism/Jewish Outreach Institute (JOI) touched the lives of more than 1,000 less-engaged Jews and members of intermarried families through the use of Public Space JudaismSM and Inclusive JudaismSM programming in over 40 communities across North America. I wanted to use this opportunity to outline the difference between these two types of JOI programs, and to explain how each type of program impacts individuals not currently involved in organized Jewish life.

Public Space Judaism is JOI’s programmatic model designed to take Judaism out of the four walls of Jewish institutions and into the public secular space, where Jews and their families are more likely to be. We know that while only 31% of American Jewish adults are currently affiliated with a synagogue, a much larger portion, 70% according to the Pew Study, celebrate a Passover seder. So in addition to open and inclusive programming in synagogues or JCCs, we train our partners and professionals (including our Big Tent Judaism Professional Affiliates and Big Tent Judaism Concierges) to implement Passover in the Matzah AisleSM in local grocery stores, where Jewish people and their families are most likely to be in the weeks before Passover. (more…)



When Conversion Creates an Intermarriage

There are rabbis who are not prepared to officiate at interfaith weddings. This is not news to most people in the Jewish community. But what about rabbis who are not prepared to help a potential convert actually convert to Judaism because the spouse/partner of the potential convert is of another background and may not plan to convert? Did you know about this subset of rabbis?

In the minds of these rabbis, such an action would be creating an intermarriage—since one partner would now be Jewish and the other would remain tied to another background. Therefore, this would be tantamount to officiating at an intermarriage, since it would essentially be creating one. Rather than welcoming yet another person with open arms in the Jewish community, we have somehow figured out yet another way to place an obstacle in front of a person, limiting our own growth and expansion as a community. This seems counter-intuitive to me.

We at Big Tent Judaism/Jewish Outreach Institute (JOI) want to open the doors to those who want to cast their lot with the Jewish people, and we want to find a way to lower the barriers to do so. If you want to help, or would like our help in lowering the barriers in your community, let me know. We are always looking for program partners in our effort to expand the tent.



Is Seth Meyers Jewish Enough?

If you didn’t catch “Late Night with Seth Meyers” the other night, his guest, author Jonah Kerry, brought him a yarmulke (Jewish head covering, also called a kipah) as a gift. because he thought Meyers was Jewish. Of course, he also thought it would be a funny gag.

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Moms Are as Diverse as Fish in the Sea

Like life under the sea, there is tremendous diversity in the Jewish community ecosystem and that extends to moms. Whether you are a Jewish mom, mom of another religious background, married mom, single mom, adoptive mom, or helicopter mom, your kids see you as “mom.”

Whatever your family structure, Big Tent Judaism/Jewish Outreach Institute (JOI) wants to thank you for making the effort to bring Judaism into your children’s lives, since they are the faces of our future.

Happy Mother’s Day!

How does your unique family structure strengthen the Jewish community? Click here to share on our Facebook page!



JOI’s New Communication Associate Looks Forward to Celebrating Diversity

Big Tent Judaism/Jewish Outreach Institute (JOI) is a seemingly unlikely place for me to be working. I avoided all Jewish activities in college (Hillel and the like), only attended synagogue for the High Holidays and the occasional “Shabbat Chaverim” (literally “Sabbath friends,” a program that my Temple holds which encourages people to sing, dance, and eat together on Shabbat), and lived in a fairly non-observant household. People who know me knew that I had always wanted to live in New York, but I am sure they imagined me working in entertainment (I interned at a traveling circus when I was in college).

When I was a child I experienced the paradox of spending my childhood being immersed in a vibrant Jewish community to moving in middle school and being the only Jew in a community. When I was in elementary school my community was able to support a Jewish day school, which I was fortunate to attend. During my formative years I was taught the Hebrew alphabet, Torah stories, prayers, and how to observe the holidays. This education helped me connect to the Jewish community and provide understanding to Jewish traditions and culture. When I was 12, my family moved to a rural part of Iowa, where my family was the only Jewish family and my connection to Judaism had greatly diminished.
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An Open Letter to Chelsea Clinton

This piece was originally featured in The Examiner on April 30, 2014. To read it, please click here.

Dear Ms. Clinton:

On behalf of everyone at Big Tent Judaism/Jewish Outreach Institute (JOI), I would like to congratulate you and your husband on your pregnancy. I like to say: having a child is no big deal; it just changes your whole life. As a parent—and grandparent—I am excited for you and your family.

I would also like to be the first to welcome your baby into the Jewish community. While you may not yet have decided in what faith you will raise your child, I want you to know that we consider women who have married into the Jewish community to be unsung heroes when they make the effort to raise Jewish children. As a result, we want to make sure that you are welcomed and celebrated. It is one of the reasons we developed The Mothers Circle. Sometimes raising a child in the Jewish community without the benefit of a Jewish background is like living in a foreign country without the benefit of foreign language skills. The Mothers Circle suite of free programs provides you with what you may need to help navigate the Jewish community.
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Learning from Missed Opportunities

When people think about our model for Public Space Judaism, especially in the context of Passover in the Matzah Aisle—a premier example of such a successful program—they often think of standard Passover programming, albeit in the context of a supermarket. However, twice this year major holiday periods coincided with major Jewish holidays. The Thanksgiving weekend included Hanukkah. And Easter Sunday, an obviously Christian holiday, coincided with Passover. Before anyone accuses me of syncretism, let’s analyze both dates.

In the case of the Sunday following Thanksgiving, many families were traveling. The winter shopping season had been initiated and virtually everything in North America remained open. However, on Easter Sunday, few things were open. So those in the Jewish community—even those who were unaffiliated or not particularly observant in the traditional sense—found few places to spend their leisure hours.

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Lessons Learned from the Other Pew Study

Although I am often loathe to identify myself as a millennial, I enjoyed reading “Millennials in Adulthood,” the recent Pew report on the lives and values of my generation. Unlike the Pew Research Center’s “A Portrait of Jewish Americans” that took the Jewish communal world by storm last fall, this Pew study has made no discernable splash in the same waters. For those concerned about the Jewish future though, I think the findings from this new Pew study are just as important.

So, what does the research tell us? First, that young adults—the researchers surveyed a national sample of adults ages 18-33—are increasingly detached from institutions, be they religious or political. About three in ten, or 29%, of millennials are religiously unaffiliated, and half (50%) identify themselves as political independents (with a margin of error of 2.6%). The movement from institutional membership toward what JOI’s Executive Director Kerry Olitzky has coined as “playlist Judaism,” which is reflective of more than just Judaism; rather, it reflects the new ways my peers and I relate to the world.

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When You Open the Door for Elijah, Open the Door to Inclusion

Every aspect of the Passover seder is infused with meaning, connecting Jews across the world in a celebration of liberation. One such event takes place toward the end of the seder, when we open the door for Elijah the Prophet, hoping that he will grace the seder with his presence and herald the arrival of the Messiah. At Big Tent Judaism/Jewish Outreach Institute (JOI), we view an inclusive community that welcomes everyone who would cast their lot with the Jewish people as a positive step toward that messianic age.

JOI created “Welcoming Elijah the Prophet,” a Passover haggadah supplement that promotes the message of LGBT inclusion and supporting LGBT interfaith families as valued members of the Jewish community. This haggadah supplement emerges from the LGBT Interfaith Parents Circle, our program for LGBT interfaith couples who are raising or considering raising Jewish children. The LGBT Interfaith Parents Circle is currently being piloted in Los Angeles, and we hope to expand the program over the coming years.

As you embark on your Passover celebrations, we encourage you to share this supplement with the people gathered around your seder table, as well as anyone else who may benefit from this resource.





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